Sunday, September 26, 2021

Phareodus testis Fish Fossil


My trip earlier this month to Alpena, Michigan USA with several amateur paleontologists from Louisville and Chicago, we visited a local paleontologist Paleo Joe (aka  Joseph Kchodl). This picture is of one of his fish fossils from Kemmerer, Wyoming USA. This fossil is known as Phareodus testis (Cope, 1877). It was found in the Green River Formation and existed in the Eocene Epoch Paleogene Period.

Saturday, September 25, 2021

Desmograptus micronematodes Graptolite Fossil


My trip earlier this month to Alpena, Michigan USA with several amateur paleontologists from Louisville and Chicago, we visited a local paleontologist Paleo Joe (aka  Joseph Kchodl). This picture is of one of his graptolite fossils from Middleport, New York USA. This fossil is known as Desmograptus micronematodes (Spencer, 1884). It was found in the Rochester Shale and existed in the Silurian Period.

 

Species was named by Joseph Winthorp Spencer (1851-1921) in Graptolites of the upper Silurian System (Niagara fossils). Bulletin of the University of Missouri Museum, 1, pages 555–610 published 1884.

Dr. Spencer is buried at Grove Cemetery in Dundas, Ontario, Canada.

Friday, September 24, 2021

Fossils at Mich-E-Ke-Wis Park

 Mich-E-Ke-Wis Park overlooks Lake Huron in Alpena, Michigan USA. Huge boulders line the waterline are a good place to explore to see so many fossils. So many death ensembles of a lot of brachiopod fossils as shown in first 2 pictures. My foot as reference shows how big an area the fossils are spread. Below shows Atrypa (Hall, 1862) brachiopods in close up.
 
 

This next picture shows a panoramic of coastline to explore.

The following picture shows the marks made by glacier movement thousands of years ago.

Last picture is of a large Hexagonaria (Whitefield, 1882) fossil.


Great place to visit. They have a nice playground and nice restaurants next to the park with great lake side views.

Thursday, September 23, 2021

Crinoid Stem Wampum

 

This month I paid a brief visit to the Besser Museum at Alpena, Michigan, USA. They had a large exhibit on Native American artifacts found in Michigan. While it was not identified as the above pictures are wampum that had threaded sting of crinoid columnals according to the 2018 book 101 American Fossil Sites you've gotta see by Albert Binkley Dickas (pages 98-99). It makes sense as while fossil hunting in Alpena I found quite a few crinoid stems. Though I am not sure since the exhibit was labeled "Various Shell Beads". It is looks like the shells where cut in circles and then a hole drilled in the middle. So they look like crinoid stems.

The Besser Museum for Northwest Michigan was named for Jesse Besser (1882-1970) who perfected and produced machines that create these famous concrete blocks. Out in the yard is a huge boulder sized Hexagonaria (Gürich, 1896) coral fossil (see my foot for size reference). They also have areas where you can search for and keep fossils from material dumped there from local quarry.



Wednesday, September 22, 2021

Predation on Atrypa Brachiopod Fossil

 

Here is a cool picture of an Atrypa (Hall, 1862) brachiopod fossil (note the circle in the top left corner probably made by a gastropod). The fossil was found in the Genshaw Formation at Carmeuse Quarry, Rogers City, Michigan USA. The creature lived Middle Devonian Period (Erian Stage).




Tuesday, September 21, 2021

Cyrtina alpenensis Brachiopod Fossil

 

Earlier this month, I found this brachiopod fossil in the Genshaw Formation of Alpena, Michigan, USA. It appears to be a Cyrtina alpenensis (Hall & Clarke, 1895). This creature lived in middle Devonian Period (Erian Stage).






Monday, September 20, 2021

Eunema speciosum Gastropod Fossil

While collecting in Alpena Michigan USA earlier this month, I found something that I could not immediately identify. It was gastropod fossil found in the Potters Farm Formation of the Traverse Group. The fossil dates to the middle Devonian Period (Givetian Stage). After consulting with Paleo Joe he told me it was a Longstaffia speciosa (Whiteaves, 1892) snail fossil as identified in Devonian Strata of Alpena and Presque Isle Counties, Michigan by G. M. Ehlers and R. V. Kesling (1970) [LINK]. For some reason the species name was altered in this document from its original name which ended in the letters "um" which were replaced with the letter "a". In Latin, words that end in "um" are genitive plural and plural words end in "a".

This species was named by Joseph Frederick Whiteaves (1835-1909) as Eunema speciosum in 1892's The Fossils of the Devonian Rocks of the Islands, Shores or Immediate Vicinity of Lakes Manitoba and Winnipegosis [LINK]. The genus Eunema was named by Salter in 1859 and then renamed in 1908 by Cossmann to Longstaffia.


According to Fossilworks the new name for this fossil is Kitikamispira speciosum (Wagner, 2020).



Saturday, September 18, 2021

Huntonia huntonensis Trilobite Fossil

On a recent trip to Alpena, Michigan USA with several amateur paleontologists from Louisville and one from Chicago, we visited a local paleontologist Paleo Joe (aka  Joseph Kchodl). This picture is of one of his trilobite fossils from Oklahoma. This fossil is known as Huntonia huntonensis (Ulrich & Delo, 1940). It was found in the Haragan Formation and existed in the Devonian Period.

 Learn more about this trilobite in the Oklahoma Geological Survey Bulletin 123 Trilobites of the Haragan, Bois D'Arc and Frisco Formations (Early Devonian) Arbuckle Mountains Region, Oklahoma by K. S. W. Campbell (1977). Paper can be found at this LINK.

Friday, September 17, 2021

Favosites mammillatus Coral Fossil

Last week I visited Alpena, Michigan USA with several amateur paleontologists from Louisville and one from Chicago. We were luck to have a local paleontologist Paleo Joe (aka  Joseph Kchodl) as our guide. This picture is of one of his finds from Alpena. A common coral known as Favosites mammillatus (Stumm & Tyler, 1964). It was found in the Potter Farm Formation and lived in the middle Devonian Period.

Saturday, September 11, 2021

Cyathophyllum helianthoides Coral Fossil

Here is a picture of a Cyathophyllum helianthoides coral fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Fossil was found in Gerolstein Eifel Germany. It dates to the Devonian Period
Image taken in June 2014.

Friday, September 10, 2021

Cyathophyllum hexagonum Coral Fossil

Here is a picture of a Cyathophyllum hexagonum coral fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Fossil was found in Gerolstein Eifel Germany. It dates to the Devonian Period
Image taken in June 2014.

Thursday, September 9, 2021

Agathiphyllia gregaria Coral Fossil

Here is a picture of an Agathiphyllia gregaria coral fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Fossil was found in Belforte Monferrato Alessandris Piemonte Italy. It dates to the Oligocene Epoch.

Image taken in June 2014.

Wednesday, September 8, 2021

Dendrophillia america Coral Fossil

Here is a picture of a Dendrophillia america coral fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Fossil was found in Siena, Tuscany Italy.

Image taken in June 2014.

Tuesday, September 7, 2021

Chama placentina Fossil

Here is a picture of a Chama placentina (Defrance, 1817) bivalve fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Creatures like this existed in the ocean at the time of the Pleistocene Epoch. Fossil was found in Italy.

Image taken in June 2014.

Monday, September 6, 2021

Placenticeras meeki Ammonite Fossil

Here is a picture of a Placenticeras meeki ammonite fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Creatures like this existed in the western interior seaway at the time of the upper/late Cretaceous Period (ICS geological timescale: Maastrichtian; 70 million years ago). Fossil was found in Cheyenne River of South Dakota USA.

Image taken in June 2014.

Friday, September 3, 2021

Tinca tarsiger Fish Fossil

 

This fish fossil was on display at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York City in July 2018. The specimen was named Tinca tarsiger (Garsault, 1764). This fish belongs to the minnow or carp family. It was found at Rott, Germany and dates to the Late Oligocene Epoch (25 million years ago). Accession number is AMNH 778.

Learn more about the museum at https://www.amnh.org/

Thursday, September 2, 2021

Tharrhias Fish Fossil

 

This fish fossil was on display at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York City in July 2018. The specimen was named Tharrhias sp. (Jordan & Branner, 1908). The name means "bold one" and is related to a modern milkfish (Chanos). It was found at Chapada do Araripe, Ceará, Brazil and dates to the middle Cretaceous Period (110 million years ago). Accession number is AMNH 12618R.

Genus was named for American geologist John Casper Branner (1850-1922). David Starr Jordan (1851-1931).

Learn more about the museum at https://www.amnh.org/

Wednesday, September 1, 2021

Helicoprion Teeth Fossil

 

The image of teeth arranged in a spiral of lower jaw was on display at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York City in July 2018. This animal is called Helicoprion. The name means "spiral jaw". It was found at Waterloo Phosphate Mine near Montpelier, Idaho,USA. The fossil dates to the early Permian Period (280 million years ago). Specimen number is AMNH 8250.

Saturday, August 28, 2021

26th Annual Digging the Past Event

 

Back from volunteering at the Falls of the Ohio State Park (Clarksville, Indiana USA) where I spent about 4 hours identifying and digging up Silurian fossils for visitors to the park. I spent my time at the four socially distanced Waldron Shale piles containing Silurian period fossils. It was a real treat working this year as I was paired with local historian/teacher and park volunteer Kenny Karem. I enjoyed hearing his stories about his long time friend and Falls park advocate Ruth Browne (1905-1999).

Even though it rained yesterday, the piles did not yield too many fossils on the surface. After splitting some of the shale rocks, I found several Eucalyptocrinites crinoid cups and some stem pieces. These fossils were given to some teachers from Ohio.


This next image shows Atrypa and Fardenia brachiopod fossil imprints (negative). I gave the positive side away to someone not having much luck finding any fossils. Did not take a picture of it before hand. A number white calcite Atrypa brachiopods were found while I was there.

Last image is of a mineral found in the Waldron Shale: pyrite or "fool's gold". I challenged a number of children collecting at the piles to try and find some pyrite crystals to take home with them.

All in all a nice day. It was hot (in the 90s F and humid). Working in the shale piles was muddy. I did not get to check out how the mineral piles or Devonian period fossil piles were going. The Devonian one was very mucky and wet.

Read my write up of this event in 2020 at THIS LINK.


Barnicle Sculpture

 

My wife took this picture of a steel and cast cement sculpture by Kari Reardon in 2019. It is called "The Barnacle" inspired by water animals found in Lake Minnetonka, Minnesota, USA.

The sculpture can be seen at River View Park at 404 Wilkinson Blvd. Frankfort, Kentucky USA.

The shapes reminds me of crinoid holdfasts.

Monday, August 16, 2021

Arietites bucklandi Ammonite Fossil

 

This picture is of a Arietites bucklandi (Sowerby, 1816) ammonite fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. This creature existed in the Jurassic Period. Species was named for William Buckland (1784-1856). Learn more about the museum at: http://www.dst.uniroma1.it/en/structures/museum

Image taken in June 2014.

Sunday, August 15, 2021

Dinosaur Whiskey Flask

 

A somewhat odd post today about a fossil related item I saw while visiting the Oscar Getz Museum of Whiskey History at Bardstown, Kentucky, USA. They had several cabinets of unique whiskey containers and one was in the shape of a dinosaur. Below is mold used to create bottles.

The museum is free to visit and is located in Spalding Hall (built around 1826; rebuilt 1839). The building also hosts the Bardstown Historical Museum. The building is located at 114 North 5th Street and Xavier Drive in Bardstown Kentucky USA. It is part of the complex with the historic Basilica of St. Joseph Proto-Cathedral.

Friday, August 13, 2021

Kannemeyeria erithrea Dicynodont Fossil Skull

 

The image of this mammal-like skull fossil cast was on display at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York City in July 2018. This dicynodont is called Kannemeyeria erithrea. The genus was named for Daniel Rossouw Kannemeyer (1843-1925). It was found by H. F. Donner in 1952 at Cape Providence, South Africa. The fossil dates to the Triassic Period (230 million years ago). Specimen number is AMNH 7512.

Thursday, August 12, 2021

Lycaenops ornatus Skeleton Fossil

The image of this mammal-like fossil was on display at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York City in July 2018. This animal is called Lycaenops ornatus. The name means "wolf shape". It was found by Robert Bloom (1866-1951) in 1928 at Biesjespoort Station, South Africa. The fossil dates to the Permian Period (255 million years ago). Specimen number is AMNH 2240.

Tuesday, August 10, 2021

Edmontonia rugosidens Dinosaur Fossil

The image of this dinosaur fossil was on display at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York City in July 2018. This ankylosaur is called Edmontonia rugosidens. It was found by Charles Hazelius Sternberg (1850-1943) in 1917 at Red Deer River in Alberta Canada. The fossil dates to the late Cretaceous Period (75 million years ago).

Sunday, August 8, 2021

Lepidodiscus alleganius Edrioasteroid Fossil

 


This scan is from the book is called New York State Museum Bulletin 49 December 1901 Paleontologic Papers 2. It contains a number of papers including one called New Agelacrinites by John Mason Clarke (1857-1925). He named this new species Lepidodiscus alleganius (Clarke, 1901). Fossil like this are found in the Chemung sandstones at and near Alfred, Belvidere and Wellsville New York, USA, and 2 miles south of Sabinville, Tioga County Pennsylvania, USA. This fossil dates to the Devonian Period.

The fossil was re-evaluated in the paper The Classification of the Edrioasteroidea by R.S. Bassler (1878-1961) and its genus changed to Cooperidiscus. This paper was published in Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections Volume 93, Number 8 (April 4, 1935).

Saturday, August 7, 2021

Brannerion Fish Fossil

This fish fossil was on display at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York City in July 2018. The specimen was named Brannerion sp. (Jordan, 1920). It was found at Chapada do Araripe, Ceará, Brazil and dates to the middle Cretaceous Period (110 million years ago). Accession number is AMNH 11892.

Genus was named for American geologist John Casper Branner (1850-1922). David Starr Jordan (1851-1931) named this genus in a paper New Genera of Fossil Fishes from Brazil in the Proceedings of The Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia Volume LXXI, 1920, pages 208-210.

Learn more about the museum at https://www.amnh.org/

Friday, August 6, 2021

Araripichthys castilhoi Fish Fossil

This fish fossil was on display at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York City in July 2018. The specimen was named Araripichthys castilhoi (Silva Santos, 1985). It was found at Chapada do Araripe, Ceara, Brazil and dates to the middle Cretaceous Period (110 million years ago). Accession number is AMNH 12576.

Learn more about the museum at https://www.amnh.org/