Tuesday, June 1, 2021

Conchologist Elizabeth Letson

 

While reviewing one of Amadeus Grabau publications about New York fossils, it contained a section written by Elizabeth J. Letson. Staying with my 2021 theme of researching 19th century women in science I had to investigate.

Outside of Buffalo, New York it appears this remarkable woman's achievements have slipped past the modern historian's view.

Elizabeth Jane Letson was born April 9, 1874 at Griffins Mills, New York (Erie County). The only child of Augustus Franklin Letson (1841-1900) and Nellie Webb Letson (1850-1924). Her mother was a 8th descendant of original settler William Bradford from the Mayflower and was direct descendant of Governor Bradford, first governor of Massachusetts.

She attended schools in Buffalo, New York. At an early age, she became interested in natural history, in particular conchology. After graduating, she continued her education at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia (ANSP) after receiving the Jessup fellowship. She spent two years working with Henry Augustus Pilsby (1862-1957). When she died at a relatively young age of 44, he wrote her obituary in The Nautilus (journal of malacology).  Later, she studied at the United States National Museum in Washington, D.C.

At the age 18, she started working at the Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences in 1892 where she would remain for 17 years. At first she volunteered to clean the museum and arrange the library. She eventually rose to the position on Director of the Buffalo Museum in 1899.

In 1898, she named Tethys pilsbryi after her mentor Henry Pilsbry at ANSP.

She formed the Conchological Club in 1899. 

In 1901 she published in the New York State Museum bulletin about post-Pliocene fossils found Niagara river gravels and in 1905 a list of mollusca found in New York.

In 1904, she traveled from Veracruz, Mexico to New York October 20-28 via the S.S. Havana.

In 1906, Alfred University conferred upon her the honorary degree of Doctor of Science.

She married William Alanson Bryan (1875-1942) on March 16, 1909 at St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Buffalo, New York. They moved to Hawaii in May 1909 where her husband was a professor at the College of Hawaii. She worked as the librarian at the college. 

Dr. Bryan and Elizabeth took an extended trip in 1917-1918 to the United States. They departed Honolulu July 3, 1917 on the S.S. Wilhelmina which arrived in San Francisco on July 10, 1917. The couple spent several months as the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences researching Hawaiian marine mollusks. They also spent time research Hawaiian shells at the Smithsonian and Harvard museums.

Elizabeth Letson Bryan died at 11:20 PM, February 28, 1919 in Honolulu, Hawaii of heart disease. She was reported to having been ill for 8 months prior to her death. Her mentor Henry Pilsbry wrote of her "gracious personality and sunny outlook, no less than the genuine love of nature which determined the course of her life, made her many warm friends who mourn her untimely death."

Dr. Letson was a member of the American Anthropological Society, the National Geographic Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Audubon Society of Pennsylvania, the New York State committee for the Women's Out-of-door Art League, the American Civic Association, the Conchological Society of Great Britain and Ireland, the Buffalo Society, and the Mayflower Society of New York State.

Donations 

Academy of Natural Sciences Philadelphia (A.N.S.P.) 1917

"Prof. W. A. and E. L. Bryan. Eight species of shells, Hawaiian Islands"

Species Named by Her

Tethys pilsbryi  (Letson, 1898)

Species Name for Her

Amnicola letsoni (Walker, 1901)

Tellina (Arcopagia) elizabethae (Pilsbry, 1917) type no 80253 at A.N.S.P.

"Its distinctness from that species was brought to my attention by Mrs. Bryan for whom it is named."

Turbonilla (Evaletta) elizabethae (Pilsbry, 1917) type no 117596 at A.N.S.P.

"This pretty, delicately colored shell is named for Mrs. W.A. Bryan."

Species Named for Her Mother

Odostomia letsonae (Pilsby, 1917) type no 117600 at A.N.S.P.

"It was picked from beach debris by Mrs. Letson, whose work on the minutes shells of this locality has brought many interesting species to light."

Sources:

Dr. Elizabeth Letson Bryan, Former Buffalonian, Noted for Scientific Work, Dies in Hawaii, The Buffalo Evening Times, Saturday, March 22, 1919. page 9. 

Pilsbry, Henry Augustus, Obituary for Elizabeth Letson Byran, Sc. D. The Nautilus, 1919 page 142.


E. J. Letson. “Description of a New Tethys (Aplysia).” Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, vol. 50, 1898, pp. 193–193. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/4062402. Accessed 30 May 2021.

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/43807680/elizabeth-jane-bryan

 

Wikipedia page:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Jane_Letson_Bryan


Tuesday, May 18, 2021

Midge Fly Fossil

 

The image shows a midge fly insect fossil found in the Florissant Formation of Teller County, Colorado, USA. It dates to the Eocene Epoch of the Paleogene Period. Thanks to Doug for the image. Field of view (FOV) is 7 mm.

Monday, May 17, 2021

Snout Beetle Fossil

The image shows a snout beetle or weevil insect fossil of the Order Coleoptera, Family Curculionidae found in the Florissant Formation of Teller County, Colorado, USA. It dates to the Eocene Epoch of the Paleogene Period. Thanks to Doug for the image.

Tuesday, May 11, 2021

Leidyosuchus wilsoni Crocodile Skull Fossil

 

This crocodile skull fossil was on display at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York City in July 2018. The fossil was named Leidyosuchus wilsoni (Mook, 1959). It was found in the Green River Formation at Wamsutter, Wyoming, USA and dates to the Middle Eocene Epoch. Accession number is AMNH 7637 and it is the type specimen. A gift from L. R. Wilson in 1956.

It was described in April 22, 1959 issue of American Museum Novitates in an paper entitled A New Species of Fossil Crocodile of the Genus Leidyosuchus from the Green River Beds by Charles C. Mook.

Learn more about the museum at https://www.amnh.org/

Monday, May 10, 2021

Plecia Twist Fly Fossils

 

These insect fossils were on display at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York City in July 2018. They are called Plecia sp. (Wiedemann, 1828) aka Twist Flies. The fossils were found in the Green River Formation at White Mountain, Wyoming, USA and dates to the Eocene Epoch. Accession number is AMNH 28381.

Learn more about the museum at https://www.amnh.org/

 

Sunday, May 9, 2021

Mioplosus labracoides Fish Fossil

 

This fish fossil was on display at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York City in July 2018. The perch fish was named Mioplosus labracoides (Cope, 1877). It was found in the Green River Formation at Fossil Butte National Monument, Wyoming, USA and dates to the Eocene Epoch. Accession number is AMNH 2972.

Learn more about the museum at https://www.amnh.org/

Sunday, May 2, 2021

Leptodesma marcellense Pelecypod Fossil

 

Here are a series of images drawn by Elvira Wood in 1901 which she used to show fossil pelecypod called Leptodesma marcellense (Hall). She described and illustrated it in the 1901 paper Marcellus (Stafford) Limestones of Lancaster, Erie Co. N.Y. on pages 190. Illustrations on plate 9 figures 16 and 17.

Saturday, May 1, 2021

Onychochilus nitidulus Gastropod Fossil

 

Here is an image drawn by Elvira Wood in 1901 which she used to show fossil gastropod called Onychochilus (?) nitidulus (Clarke, 1894). She described and illustrated it in the 1901 paper Marcellus (Stafford) Limestones of Lancaster, Erie Co. N.Y. on pages 190. Illustration on plate 9 figure 20. Described as "A small exfoliated specimen."

On page 170, listed as "In bed III is found a minute sinistrally coiled gastropod which corresponds with Clark's description and figures except that, instead of a faint carination of the whorls, there is a distinct spiral band. The concentric growth lines are interrupted in passing over this band, which is apparently partially filled by foreign matter. This feature is well shown on the body whorls of one specimen only, but, if the  discovery of other specimens confirm this observation, they should be referred to the genus Hesperiella of Holzapfel rather than Onychochilus, with which I have doubtfully placed my specimens."

Friday, April 30, 2021

Camarotoechia prolifica Brachiopod Fossil

 

Here are a series of images drawn by Elvira Wood in 1901 which she used to show fossil brachiopod called Camarotoechia prolifica (Hall). She described and illustrated it in the 1901 paper Marcellus (Stafford) Limestones of Lancaster, Erie Co. N.Y. on pages 162.

 



 

Monday, April 26, 2021

Camarotoechia pauciplicata Brachiopod Fossil

Plate 9 Figure 7 Camarotoechia pauciplicata sp. nov. dorsal view of a specimen from the Stafford limestone of Genesee county.
 

Here are a series of images drawn by Elvira Wood in 1901 which she used to name a new species of brachiopod called Camarotoechia pauciplicata. She described and illustrated it in the 1901 paper Marcellus (Stafford) Limestones of Lancaster, Erie Co. N.Y. on pages 162-163.

"Associated with Camarotoechia sappho and C. horsfordi are specimens which differ from both in important respects. The outline of these shells is subpentagonal, the greatest width being two thirds the distance from the beak to the anterior margin. Pedicle valve slightly convex in the posterior portion but becoming depressed in the sinus and extended in front to meet the margin of the brachial valve. Beak elevated and slightly incurved. Brachial valve gibbous, the greatest convexity being at about the middle of the shell. Surface marked by three subangular plications on the fold, two in the sinus, and three broad, low plications on the lateral slopes. These are crossed by well marked lines of growth. Plications absent near the beaks and becoming well defined at about one fourth the length of the shell from the beak. A well marked constriction of both valves is often present about half way between the beak and anterior margin. The interior could not be observed. The nearly straight cardinal slopes, elevated ventral beak, and few plications of the fold and sinus are the most characteristic features of the species.

This species resembles externally Pugnax utah of the upper Coal Measures, but the specimens are longer in proportion to the width, and the plications become visible nearer the beak than in the latter species. From Camarotoechia (?) duplicata, of the Chemung beds, it differs in the unequal convexity of the valves, straight cardinal slopes, and greater number of lateral plications. This species shell has been found by the writer in material from the Stafford limestone of the Livonia shaft (N. Y. state museum)."

 

Plate 9 Figure 8 Camarotoechia pauciplicata sp. nov. anterior view of a specimen from the Stafford limestone of Genesee county.

 
Plate 9 Figure 9 Camarotoechia pauciplicata sp. nov. ventral view of a specimen from the Stafford limestone of Genesee county.

Plate 9 Figure 10 Camarotoechia pauciplicata sp. nov. pedicle valve of a specimen from which the beak has been broken.

Plate 9 Figure 11 Camarotoechia pauciplicata sp. nov. lateral view of the same

Plate 9 Figure 12 Camarotoechia pauciplicata sp. nov. dorsal valve


Sunday, April 25, 2021

Crania recta Brachiopod Fossil

 

Crania recta Plate 9 Figure 2 Mold of upper valve, with portion of shell attached, showing muscular scars.

The U.S. Postal Service just delivered a book I purchased from Willis Monie-Books of Cooperstown, New York USA. The book is called New York State Museum Bulletin 49 December 1901 Paleontologic Papers 2. It contains a number of papers including one called Marcellus (Stafford) Limestones of Lancaster, Erie Co. N.Y. by Elvira Wood.

Crania recta Plate 9 Figure 3 View of another specimen similarly preserved.

 She describes the new brachiopod species Crania recta on page 157-158.

"The three specimens obtained are all upper valves. Two are molds of the external surface with minute fragments of the posterior portion of the shell retained; the third shows the exterior. The former were attached to the interior and the latter to the exterior of the living chamber of Orthoceras.

Upper valve transverse, having the form of a flattened rim with sharply elevated central portion; beak subcentral. A shallow sinus, widening toward the front, extends from the beak to the anterior margin. Outline of the valve straight on the posterior side, regularly rounded at the sides, and slightly arcuate in front. Surface marked by fine lines of growth. Under a strong magnifier the surface is seen to be minutely granulose, a feature not visible under an ordinary hand lens. Posterior adductor scars are shown on a fragment of shell remaining. 

Lower valve unknown. 

The characteristic features of the species are the straight posterior margin and greater transverse diameter.

Measurements of three specimens are: 1) anteroposterior 5 mm, lateral 7.8 mm; 2) anteroposterior 5 mm, lateral 6 mm; 3) anteroposterior 4 mm, lateral 5.2 mm, depth 1 mm."

Crania recta Plate 9 Figure 1 The upper valve with outlines of dorsoventral and lateral sections.



Wednesday, April 21, 2021

Crinoid Fossil Column Section

 

 

This crinoid fossil was collected in 2009 at Lake Cumberland Kentucky USA. It dates to the Mississippian Period and was found in the Fort Payne Formation. Recently, I had it out to test a new ultrasonic cleaner.



Wednesday, March 31, 2021

Myliobatus Eagle Ray Toothplate Fossils

These images are of Myliobatus striatus? (Eagle Ray) fossils on display at Mace Brown Museum of Natural History (August 2017). They date to the Eocene Epoch (about 50-45 million years ago), Paleogene Period. The fossil was found in Santee Quarry, Harleyville, South Carolina USA.

The Mace Brown Museum of Natural History is located at the College of Charleston, 202 Calhoun Street, 2nd Floor, Charleston, South Carolina 29424.

Learn more at their blog: http://blogs.cofc.edu/macebrownmuseum/

 



Sunday, March 28, 2021

Paleontologist Marjorie O'Connell

 

 In honor of Women's History month, this entry is about a female paleontologist that had a brief career in this field. The above image is courtesy of Dr. Katherine Dettwyler and might have been taken around 1920. Marjorie O'Connell was born on August 15, 1890 in Newark, New Jersey. She attended Ethical Cultural School in New York City on scholarship. Marjorie graduated in 1908 after attending for 15 years.

 


After high school, she attended Barnard College from 1908 till 1911 on scholarship. Barnard College was a school for women that was affiliated with Columbia University at the time which was all-male undergraduate. The above image was taken from the 1911 yearbook The Mortarboard for the Barnard College class of 1912. It was at this college that she encountered a famous paleontologist Professor Amadeus Grabau (1870-1946). He encouraged her to go to graduate school and study paleontology. It is possible she may have encountered another female paleontologist written about on this blog before Elvira Wood (1865-1928). Miss Wood would have been teaching at the college while getting her graduate degrees at Columbia University.

She officially graduated from Barnard College on June 6, 1912 but was already attending graduate school at Columbia University in New York City where she obtained her Master's in the Arts in 1912. She was a Curtis scholar from 1912 to 1913. O'Connell worked as curator and lecturer of Paleontology at Columbia University 1914 to 1916. She was an instructor of geology at Adelphi College 1913-1914. 

 


In 1914, she published a paper Revision of the genus Zaphrentis. The paper renamed the genus of two of the largest horn corals to ever exist to Siphonophrentis which is still recognized today. Picture above on a Siphonophrentis elongata fossil horn coral found in Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA.

Hercynella patelliformis (plate 1, figure 4) in Description of Some New Siluric Gastropods (1914)

 

Also in 1914 she published Description of Some New Siluric Gastropods and received the Walker Prize from the Boston Society of Natural History for it. In the paper, she named to new fossils Hercynella buffaloensis and Hercynella patelliformis. Unfortunately, it was misidentified it as a gastropod when it was really a bivalve (H. & G. Termier 1950).

In 1915, she named a Cuban foraminifera Orbitoides kempi in an article The Mayari Iron-Ore Deposits, Cuba. 


 
Marjorie O'Connell got her PhD in 1916 with an dissertation entitled The Habitat of the Eurypterida. As of this writing, Google Scholar shows this paper has been cited 52 times in other literature. After graduating, she was awarded the $1,000 Sarah Berliner Research Fellowship for Women in 1917-1918 which she used to do research at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH). Again Elvira Wood was working here as an assistant to the curator so their paths may have crossed. The product of Dr. O'Connell's research was a 212 page paper entitled The Schrammen Collection of Cretaceous Silicispongiae in The American Museum of Natural History (published in 1919).

Perisphinctes plicatiloides Cuban ammonite fossil she named in 1920

 Dr. O'Connell stayed at the museum till about 1922. While there she worked on Cuban ammonite fossils sent back by the famous dinosaur paleontologist Barnum Brown. She co-wrote a manuscript called The Jurassic Ammonites of Cuba which was never published. After a dispute about an entry in Encyclopedia Britannica she left AMNH and the field of paleontology in 1922. Though I did find one more reference to her attending the XVI International Geological Congress of 1933 held at Washington, D.C as Marjorie O'Connell Shearon. She may have presented with Dr. Grabau, who returned from China for a visit to the United States. Picture below used with permission by Dr. Katherine Dettwyler.

She worked a number of odd jobs afterwards and later got married and worked for several government departments during the Great Depression and World War II. In Washington, D.C., she worked on healthcare lobbying as Dr. Marjorie Shearon. She died in 1974 outside of Washington D.C. Her professional papers were left to the University of Oregon at Eugene. To learn more about her interesting life, visit Dr. Katherine Dettwyler 's website https://www.marjorieoconnellshearon.com/

Fossils She Named

Horn coral genus Siphonophrentis (1914)

Foraminifera species Orbitoides kempi (1915)

Ammonite species Perisphinctes cubanensis (1920)

Ammonite species Perisphinctes delatorii (1920)

Ammonite species Perisphinctes plicatiloides (1920)

Ammonite species Ochetoceras canaliculatum burckhardti (1920) 

Ammonite species Aptychus cristobalensis (1921) 

Ammonite species Aptychus cubanensis (1921)

Ammonite species Aptychus pimientensis (1921) 

Ammonite species Ochetoceras vicente dentatum (1922)

Conclusions

Her career in paleontology was deeply influenced by Dr. Amadeus Grabau. He inspired a number of students in this field with a special emphasis on female students. The web site about her mentioned above presents compelling evidence that O'Connell and Grabau had a long term romantic affair that she terminated around 1918. Once Dr. Grabau left for China and remained there the rest of his life (he made one trip back to the United States in 1933) Marjorie's attachment to the field of paleontology diminished. This was especially the case after she could not join Barnum Brown (1873-1963) on his world travels to hunt for fossils. At that point in her life, she could either work in a museum, the geological survey or teach. None of these options appealed to her so she left for higher pay in other professions.

 Publications or Ones She Credited with Helping

Grabau, Amadeus W. Principles of Stratigraphy, A.G. Seiler and Company, New York. 1913. page vi. [LINK] "To one of them, Miss Marjorie O'Connell, A.M., instructor in Geology at Adelphi College, Brooklyn, my special thanks are due for the careful and critical attention given for a period of a full year or over to both manuscript and proof, and to the verification of the literary references, and the endeavor, by patient library research, to make the bibliographies as serviceable as possible. To her prolonged search of literature for available material, I also owe many important references which I would otherwise have missed."

O'Connell, Marjorie. Distribution and Occurrence of the Eurypterids. Bulletin of Geological Society of America, 1913, Vol. XXIV, pp. 499-515.

O'Connell, Marjorie. Revision of the genus Zaphrentis. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. New York, February 25, 1914. pp. 177-192. [LINK]

O'Connell, Marjorie. Description of Some New Siluric Gastropods. Bulletin of Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences, 1914, Vol. XI, pp. 93-103. Pl. 1. [LINK]

Kemp, J.F. The Mayari Iron-Ore Deposits, Cuba. Transactions of American Institute of Mining Engineers for 1915, pp. 11-13. Figures 5-6. [LINK] "The accompanying description has been kindly summarized by Marjorie O'Connell, M.A., Curator in Paleontology in Columbia University, who first detected the evidences of organisms in the rock." After her description of foraminiferan, Orbitoides kempi, she placed footnote 2 "Named in honor of the discoverer of the fossil, Prof. James F. Kemp of Columbia University. A complete description of this fossil will be published elsewhere."

O'Connell, Marjorie. The habitat of the Eurypterida. The Waverly Press. Baltimore, 1916. pp. 177-192. [LINK]

Grabau, Amadeus W. and O'Connell, Marjorie. Were the graptolite shales, as a rule, deep or shallow water deposits? Bulletin of Geological Society of America, Vol. 28, December 28, 1917. pp. 959-964.

O'Connell, Marjorie. The Schrammen Collection of Cretaceous Silicispongiae in The American Museum of Natural History. Bulletin of The American Museum of Natural History, Vol. XLI. New York, 1919. Art. 1, pp. 1-261, Pls. I-XIV. [LINK]

Grabau, Amadeus W. A Textbook of Geology Part I General Geology. D.C. Heath & Co. Boston. 1920 page ix. [LINK] "The entire proof was read by Dr. Marjorie O'Connell of the American Museum of Natural History," She also provided a number of original pictures used in this book.

O'Connell, Marjorie. The Jurassic Ammonite Fauna of Cuba. Bulletin of The American Museum of Natural History, Vol. XLII. New York, 1920. pp. 643-692 [LINK]

Grabau, Amadeus W. A Textbook of Geology Part II Historical Geology. D.C. Heath & Co. Boston. 1921 page iv. [LINK] "To Dr. Marjorie O'Connell I am especially indebted for careful and efficient work on the proof and illustrations."

O'Connell, Marjorie. New Species of Ammonite Opercula from the Mesozoic Rocks of Cuba. American Museum Novitates, No. 28, December 30, 1921. pp.1-15 [LINK]


O'Connell, Marjorie. Phylogeny of the Ammonite Genus Ochetoceras. Bulletin of The American Museum of Natural History, New York, July 12,1922. [LINK]

Brown, Barnum and O'Connell, Marjorie. Correlation of Jurassic formations of western Cuba. Bulletin of Geological Society of America, Vol. 33, September 30, 1922. pp. 639-664. [LINK]

References:

A big thank you to Dr. Katherine Dettwyler for making a lot of previous unknown material available at this website: https://www.marjorieoconnellshearon.com/timeline-of-marjories-life.html

Bibliography The Habitat of the Eurypterida/Vita - Wikisource, the free online library

Citation to instructor 1913-1914: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015063895778&view=1up&seq=3  

ⓘ Hercynella is a genus of fossil bivalves of late Silurian or (google-wiki.info)



Monday, March 8, 2021

Top View of Snout Beetle Fossil

 


The point of view of this insect is really nice. I am use to seeing this insect from a side view. This image shows an unidentified snout beetle insect fossil found in the Florissant Formation of Teller County, Colorado, USA. It dates to the Eocene Epoch of the Paleogene Period.

Thanks to Doug for the image. 

Sunday, March 7, 2021

Digital Necromancy?

 

Gerard Troost
Picture of daguerreotype circa 1848
On Display at Tennessee State Museum - Nashville (2010)
Miss Margaret Lindsley Warden Collection
 Tennessee Division of Geology - Bulletin 84


Recently the website MyHertiage Deep Nostalgia™ became available that allows you to animate still pictures using artificial intelligence algorithms.  In a sense, it can allow one to digitally animate those that are dead.

As a test, I submitted two images of long dead paleontologists: Gerard Troost (1776-1850) and William Borden (1823-1906). I have documented their lives in earlier posts [Troost 12-13-2009 LINK & Borden 11-12-2009 LINK] and included still frame pictures used for this trial.

William Borden Picture from Baird's History of Clark County, Indiana (1909)
 



 


Assassin Bug Fossil

 


This image shows an unidentified assassin bug insect fossil found in the Florissant Formation of Teller County, Colorado, USA. It dates to the Eocene Epoch of the Paleogene Period.

Thanks to Doug for the image. 

Saturday, March 6, 2021

Winged Ant Fossil

 


This image shows an unidentified winged ant insect fossil found in the Florissant Formation of Teller County, Colorado, USA. It dates to the Eocene Epoch of the Paleogene Period.

Thanks to Doug for the image.  

Below is a second winged ant fossil found in the same matrix.



Wednesday, March 3, 2021

Spider Fossil From Colorado

 


These images show an unidentified spider fossil found in the Florissant Formation of Teller County, Colorado, USA. It dates to the Eocene Epoch of the Paleogene Period.

Thanks to Doug for the images.


 

Tuesday, March 2, 2021

Cicada Insect Fossil

 


This image shows an unidentified cicada insect fossil found in the Florissant Formation of Teller County, Colorado, USA. It dates to the Eocene Epoch of the Paleogene Period.

Thanks to Doug for the image.

Monday, March 1, 2021

Unidentified Cone Fossil from the Florissant Formation

This image shows an unidentified leaf gall plant or cone fossil found in the Florissant Formation of Teller County, Colorado, USA. It dates to the Eocene Epoch of the Paleogene Period.

Thanks to Doug for the image.

Sunday, February 28, 2021

Florrisant Snail and Plant Fossils

 

 

This image shows an unidentified snail and plant fossil found in the Florissant Formation of Teller County, Colorado, USA. It dates to the Eocene Epoch of the Paleogene Period.

Thanks to Doug for the image.

Saturday, February 27, 2021

Florrisant Snail Fossil

 

This image shows an unidentified snail fossil found in the Florissant Formation of Teller County, Colorado, USA. It dates to the Eocene Epoch of the Paleogene Period.

Thanks to Doug for the image.

Friday, February 26, 2021

Colorado Insect Fossils

 




These images show unidentified insect fossils found in the Florissant Formation of Teller County, Colorado, USA. They date to the Eocene Epoch of the Paleogene Period.

Thanks to Doug for the images.

Thursday, February 25, 2021

Florissant Plant Fossil

 

This image shows an unidentified plant fossil found in the Florissant Formation of Teller County, Colorado, USA. It dates to the Eocene Epoch of the Paleogene Period.

Thanks to Doug for the image.