Friday, October 31, 2014

Encope micorpora Echinoderm


While visiting the Gallery of Natural History at the Arizona Historical Society Museum at Papago Park (1300 N. College Ave, Tempe Arizona 85281) I saw fossil specimen (AHS-NH#9854) Encope micorpora (Agassiz, 1841) sand dollar. Creatures like this are alive today and existed back to the Pliocene This one was found in El Golfo, Mexico.

Image of museum specimen taken October 2014.

Source to refer to:
http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/research/projects/echinoid-directory/taxa/taxon.jsp?id=2133

http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/research/projects/echinoid-directory/taxa/specimen.jsp?id=7192

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Clypeus plotii Echinoid Fossil


While visiting the Gallery of Natural History at the Arizona Historical Society Museum at Papago Park (1300 N. College Ave, Tempe Arizona 85281) I saw fossil specimen (AHS-NH#9854) Clypeus plotii (Leske, 1778) sea urchin fossil. This creature existed in the Jurassic Period (Bajocian to Oxfordian). They were found in what is now Europe and North Africa.

Images of museum specimen taken October 2014.

Source to refer to:
http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/research/projects/echinoid-directory/taxa/taxon.jsp?id=557

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Sphaeurilitides



Here is a picture of a Sphaeurilitides (Cusman) fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. It was found in the Alps.

Image taken in June 2014.

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Mytilus edulis Bivalve


This picture shows a Mytilus edulis (Gray, 1847) marine bivalve mollusc at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Creatures like this exist in today's oceans. It is also known as the blue or common mussel.

Image taken in June 2014.

Info Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_mussel

Monday, October 27, 2014

Hippurites Bivalve Fossil


This image shows a Hippurites (Lamarck, 1801) marine bivalve mollusk fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Creatures like this existed in Late Cretaceous oceans.


Images taken in June 2014.

Info Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippurites

Sunday, October 26, 2014

Parvamussium cristatellum


Here is a picture of a Parvamussium cristatellum (Dautzenberg & Bavay, 1912) bivalve fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Creatures like this existed in the Miocene Epoch of Neogene Period. At the museum it was labeled as Amussium cristatum aka Pecten cristatum (Bavay, 1905).

Image taken in June 2014.

Info Sources:
http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=215410

http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=394473

http://www.gbif.org/species/4374335

http://www.lusofossils.com/biva.html

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Constellaria Bryozoan Fossil



Here is a picture of a Constellaria bryozoan fossil. It is known for its star like patterns on the fossil surface. Recently, it was found in Maysville, Kentucky, USA. The Upper Ordovician Period formations found at that location are Grant Lake (Maysvillian) and Bull Fork (Richmondian).

Thanks to Kenny for the image.

Past related blog posts:
http://louisvillefossils.blogspot.com/2012/09/let-me-play-among-constellaria.html

http://louisvillefossils.blogspot.com/2010/03/constellaria-bryozoan-kentucky.html

http://louisvillefossils.blogspot.com/2009/10/ordovician-bryozoan-constellaria.html

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Upside Down Ordovician Trilobite


Here is a picture of an upside down trilobite fossil found recently (October 2014) in Maysville, Kentucky, USA. The Upper Ordovician Period formations found there are Grant Lake (Maysvillian) and Bull Fork (Richmondian).

Thanks to Kenny for the image.

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Maysville Kentucky Trace Fossils


Here are some pictures of trace fossils found recently (October 2014) in Maysville, Kentucky, USA. The Upper Ordovician Period formations found there are Grant Lake (Maysvillian) and Bull Fork (Richmondian).
Thanks to Kenny for the images.





Learn more at:

Kentucky Paleontological Society (KPS) web site
http://www.uky.edu/OtherOrgs/KPS/pages/jackson.html#maysville

Dry Dredgers web site
http://drydredgers.org/thumb_by_ichnofossils.htm

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Palm Fossil from Arizona


During my visit to the Gallery of Natural History at the Arizona Historical Society Museum at Papago Park (1300 N. College Ave, Tempe Arizona 85281) I saw fossil specimen (AHS-NH#14891) from Yavapai County, Arizona USA. It is a polished palm tree fossil.

Image taken October 2014.

Learn more:
http://waynesword.palomar.edu/trjune99.htm#palmwood

Monday, October 20, 2014

Woodworthia arizonica Fossil


While touring the Natural History section of the Arizona Historical Society Museum at Papago Park (1300 N. College Ave, Tempe Arizona 85281) I saw fossil specimen (AHS-NH#11646) from Chinle Formation of Holbrook, Navajo County, Arizona USA. It is a Woodworthia arizonica Jeffrey 1910 tree fossil. This plant existed in the Upper or Late Triassic Period.


Images of museum specimen taken October 2014.

Sources to refer to:
JEFFREY, E.C. 1907. Araucariopitys, a new genus of araucarians. Botanical Gazette, 44, 435-444.

JEFFREY, E.C. 1910. A new araucarian genus from the Triassic. Proceedings of the Natural History Society of Boston, 34, 325-332.

Learn more at these sites:
The Late Triassic Schilderia Adamanica and Woodworthia Arizonica Trees of the Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona, USA by G.T. Creber and S.R. Ash
http://www.readcube.com/articles/10.1111/j.0031-0239.2004.00345.x

Pasadena Rock Museum

Sunday, October 19, 2014

Fibrous Calcite from Illinois



Back in 2010 I found a Devonian brachiopod fossil with a fibrous or needlelike mineral growth in it. I was trying to determine what this was. Last week while touring the Gallery of Natural History section of the Arizona Historical Society Museum at Papago Park (1300 N. College Ave, Tempe Arizona 85281) I saw a calcite specimen (AHS-NH#11396) from Cave in the Rock, Hardin County Illinois, USA. It appears to be composed of calcite fibers. This formation type seems similar to the one I saw in the brachiopod. So maybe this type of calcite is what formed in that Devonian brachiopod. Images of museum specimen taken October 2014.


Here is an image of the Devonian brachiopod I found in Clark County, Indiana, USA.


See the rest of the pictures and more discussion of this specimen at my blog post here:

http://louisvillefossils.blogspot.com/2010/12/fibrous-or-needlelike-mineral-growth-in.html

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Lithothamnium Fossil


This picture shows a Lithothamnium calcareous algae fossil. It was found in Cagliari Sardinia Italy. The fossil dates to the Quaternary Period. Specimen can be seen at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy.


Image taken June 2014.


Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Eozoon canadense Pseudofossil


Originally this fossil was identified in 1864 or 1865 by John William Dawson as a Precambrian foraminifera. As it turns out it was metamorphosed bands of calcite and serpentine thus a pseudofossil. Specimen can be seen at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy.

Image was taken in June 2014.

Learn more at:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eozoon_canadense

Monday, October 13, 2014

Pyrite Strobeus Snail Fossil


This is one beautiful and shiny fossil! It appears to be a Strobeus pyrite gastropod fossil. It was found in a coal mine at a depth of 60-250 meters. More pictures below show some more specimens that were found.

My identification source is Fossils of Ohio (Bulletin 70, Rodney M. Feldmann Editor, State of Ohio, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey, Columbus Ohio 1986) pages 162-173, figure 24 of specimen from Putnam Hill shale (Allegheny Group, Pennsylvanian) Vinton County Ohio, OSU 46701.

The fossil was situated above the coal seam so it might be from the Pennsylvanian Period (late Carboniferous). It was found in Webster County Kentucky USA. The mines there are part of the Eastern Interior Basin. The formations found there are Sturgis, Carbondale, and Tradewater. The limestone layers are Carthage, Madisonville, Providence, Yeargiss?, and Lead Creek.

Learn more about the geology of this area at the United States Geological Survey:
http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/p1151h/penn.html



Sunday, October 12, 2014

Oreopithecus bambolii Fossil


An interesting fossil shown in this picture is of an Oreopithecus bambolii primate. The fossil can be found at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Creatures like this existed in the Miocene Epoch of Neogene Period. Fossil was found in Baccinello Basin located in Tuscany, Italy. The area was known for its lignite mines. An intact Oreopithecus fossil skeleton was found in 1958 by Johannes H├╝rzeler in one of those mines.

Image taken in June 2014.

Learn more at:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oreopithecus
http://www.museonaturalemaremma.it/index.php?id=45&L=

Thursday, October 9, 2014

Shansiella? Pyrite Gastropod Fossil


This pyrite gastropod fossil appears to be a Shansiella. It was found in a coal mine at a depth of 60-250 meters.

My identification source is Fossils of Ohio (Bulletin 70, Rodney M. Feldmann Editor, State of Ohio, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey, Columbus Ohio 1986) pages 162-173, figure 23 of specimen from Putnam Hill shale (Allegheny Group, Pennsylvanian) Vinton County Ohio, OSU 46697.

The fossil was situated above the coal seam so it might be from the Pennsylvanian Period (late Carboniferous). It was found in Webster County Kentucky USA. The mines there are part of the Eastern Interior Basin. The formations found there are Sturgis, Carbondale, and Tradewater. The limestone layers are Carthage, Madisonville, Providence, Yeargiss?, and Lead Creek.

Learn more about the geology of this area at the United States Geological Survey:
http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/p1151h/penn.html

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Pyrite Bellerophon Fossil


This pyrite gastropod fossil has well defined ridges that make it easier to identify. It appears to be a Bellerophon. It was found in a coal mine at a depth of 60-250 meters.

My identification source is Fossils of Ohio (Bulletin 70, Rodney M. Feldmann Editor, State of Ohio, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey, Columbus Ohio 1986) pages 162-173, figures 15-16 of specimen from Cambridge shale (Conemaugh Group, Pennsylvanian) New Concord, Guernsey County Ohio, OSU 46696.

The fossil was situated above the coal seam so it might be from the Pennsylvanian Period (late Carboniferous). It was found in Webster County Kentucky USA. The mines there are part of the Eastern Interior Basin. The formations found there are Sturgis, Carbondale, and Tradewater. The limestone layers are Carthage, Madisonville, Providence, Yeargiss?, and Lead Creek.

Learn more about the geology of this area at the United States Geological Survey:
http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/p1151h/penn.html

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Iereopsis Sponge Fossil with Bioclaustration?


The picture displayed is of an Iereopsis polystoma sponge fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Creatures like this existed at the time of the Upper Cretaceous Period (Campanian). The fossil was found in Misburg, Hannover, Germany.

There appears to be a trace fossil on this sponge that I have seen something like before. We find these marks sometimes on Ordovician bryozoan fossils in Kentucky and Indiana. I believe it is called bioclaustration where creatures grow around each other. The trace fossil we find is called Catellocaula vallata and whether this is something similar that survived into the Cretaceous Period... I do not know.  See that blog post here: http://louisvillefossils.blogspot.com/2011/03/catellocaula-vallata-borings.html

Image taken in June 2014.

Read further:
http://woostergeologists.scotblogs.wooster.edu/2012/04/29/woosters-fossil-of-the-week-the-classic-bioclaustration-upper-ordovician-of-ohio/

http://eurekamag.com/research/021/841/021841064.php

Monday, October 6, 2014

Pyrite Trepospira Gastropod Fossil


This gastropod fossil is interesting as it pyrite embedded in a dark shale. It appears to be a Trepospira. It was found in a coal mine at a depth of 60-250 meters.

My identification source is Fossils of Ohio (Bulletin 70, Rodney M. Feldmann Editor, State of Ohio, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey, Columbus Ohio 1986) pages 162-173, figures 13-14 of specimen from Putnam Hill shale (Allegheny Group, Pennsylvanian) south of New Philadelphia, Tuscarawas County Ohio, OSU 46720.

The fossil was situated above the coal seam so it might be from the Pennsylvanian Period (late Carboniferous). It was found in Webster County Kentucky USA. The mines there are part of the Eastern Interior Basin. The formations found there are Sturgis, Carbondale, and Tradewater. The limestone layers are Carthage, Madisonville, Providence, Yeargiss?, and Lead Creek.

Learn more about the geology of this area at the United States Geological Survey:
http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/p1151h/penn.html

Sunday, October 5, 2014

Coal Mine Cephalopod Fossil


This fossil is somewhat rare because it was found at a depth of 60-250 meters underground. The fossil was situated above the coal seam so it might be from the Pennsylvanian Period (late Carboniferous). It was found in Webster County Kentucky USA. The mines there are part of the Eastern Interior Basin. The formations found there are Sturgis, Carbondale, and Tradewater. The limestone layers are Carthage, Madisonville, Providence, Yeargiss?, and Lead Creek.

I would identify it as Pseudorthorceras. 

This next image shows two more fossils found at the same location. A cephalopod fossil that is about 17 cm long. It is next to a large crinoid stem segment.


Learn more about the geology of this area at the United States Geological Survey:
http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/p1151h/penn.html

Saturday, October 4, 2014

Cnemidium Sponge Fossil


The image shown is of a Cnemidium pertuscum Reuss sponge fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Animals like this existed at the time of the Upper Cretaceous Period (Cenomanian). The fossil was found in Bilin, Bohemia, Czech Republic.

Image taken in June 2014.

Friday, October 3, 2014

Scytalia laevis Fossil


The picture shown is of a Scytalia laevis sponge fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Creatures like this existed at the time of the Upper Cretaceous Period (Campanian). The fossil was found in Nettlingen, Hannover, Germany.

Image taken in June 2014.

Another German specimen can be seen at this fossil web site:
http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/gallery/image/23435-scytalia-turbinata-roemer-1864/

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Sigillaria Plant Fossil


This picture is of a Sigillaria sp. plant fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Plants like this existed at the time of the Carboniferous Period. The fossil was found in Westfalia, Germany.

Image taken in June 2014.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Castanea Plant Fossil


Here is a picture of a Castanea kubinyi plant leaf fossil at the Museo di Paleontologia at Sapienza University of Rome Italy. Plants like this existed at the time of the Miocene Epoch of the Neogene Period. The fossil was found in S. Angelo, Senigaglia, Marche Italy.

Image taken in June 2014.