Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Protoceratops andrewsi


The horned dinosaur (ceratopsian) Protoceratops andrewsi displayed at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This small herbivore grazed in what is now Mongolia, China in the Cretaceous Period (Mesozoic Era). This fossil was found in 1925 at the Djadokhta Formation in Bayn Dzak, Mongolia.  Dinosaur remains are accession number CM 9185.


Learn more at the museum web site: http://www.carnegiemnh.org/

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Sphenodiscus lenticularis Ammonite


The Sphenodiscus lenticularis ammonite found in the Fox Hills Formation of South Dakota, U.S.A. Originally named by Owen in 1852 the genus Ammonites. This creature swam the seas of the Upper Cretaceous. The suture pattern shown in the images was once covered by an iridescent shell.  See this link the University of Wisconsin for an example: http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~ifischer/Collections/Fossils/Images/sphenodiscus2.jpg

Thanks to Mark Palatas for letting me photograph this specimen in his collection.


Learn more at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sphenodiscus

Monday, November 28, 2011

Saivodus striatus Shark Tooth


This remarkable find of a Paleozoic shark tooth in central Kentucky is a Saivodus striatus.  This type of fossil was originally described by Agassiz in 1843 as the genus Cladodus being a member of the Ctenacanthiformes. Fossil was found in Hardin County (?) of Kentucky in the Mississippian Period Salem Limestone (Meramecian), member of Borden Formation.

The name was changed in a Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology (26(2):253-266. 2006) COMMENTS ON THE SELACHIAN GENUS CLADODUS AGASSIZ, 1843 by Christopher J. Duffin and Michal Ginter.

Here is a link to more pictures of Saivodus found in the Viséan, Mountain Limestone, vicinity of Armagh, Northern Ireland: CLICK HERE

Here is a link to another found in a cave in Tennessee: CLICK HERE

Fossil was found and prepped by Mark Palatas of Louisville.



Sunday, November 27, 2011

Pararaucaria patagonica Cone Fossil


These plant fossils are very interesting showing conifer cones of the Pararaucaria patagonica.  These plants existed in the Middle Jurassic (Callovian - 160 million years ago). Fossils found in the Santa Cruz Province of Argentina.  One of the cones has been cut in two and its flat sides are polished.

Thanks to Mark Palatas for letting me photograph these specimens in his collection.




Saturday, November 26, 2011

Emperoceras Ammonite


The Emperoceras sp. ammonite fossil displayed at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (July 2011).  The creature existed in the Western Interior seas of the Upper Cretaceous (Mesozoic Era).

Visit the Carnegie museum web site:  http://www.carnegiemnh.org/

Friday, November 25, 2011

Onniella quadrata Brachiopod


These brachiopods are the Onniella (Dalmanella) quadrata of the Maquoketa Group of Eldorado, Iowa.  The animals lived in the Late Ordovician period.  These brachiopods are similar to the ones found east of Louisville, Kentucky in the Kope Formation.  See my posting about the Dalmanella multisecta: CLICK HERE

According to the write up on the Kope Formation on Wikipedia, it is part of the three formations that make up the Maquoketa Group. So the Iowa fossils appear to have some relationship with the Kentucky fossils.





These fossils were bought from eBay seller timfossil2001 who has some nice deals on Minnesota and Iowa fossils: http://www.ebay.com/sch/timfossil2001/m.html?item=370559137286&viewitem=&_trksid=p4340.l2562


Thursday, November 24, 2011

Hormotoma Ordovician Snail


Snail fossils found in the Maquoketa formation of Eldorado, Iowa. This small snails crept the sea floor in the late Ordovician period.  The animals are of the genus Hormotoma.  Fossils are about 2 cm high. Two species found in the Maquoketa are H. trentonensis and H. major mentioned in Stratigraphy of Middle Ordovician Rocks in the Zinc-Lead District of Wisconsin, Illinois, and Iowa by Allen F. Agnew, Allen V. Heyl, C.H. Behre, and E.J. Lyons, Geological Survey Professional Paper 274-K, 1956.

Since these are molds and no shell surface details are present, species identification would be difficult.



These fossils were bought from eBay seller timfossil2001 who has some nice deals on Minnesota and Iowa fossils: http://www.ebay.com/sch/timfossil2001/m.html?item=370559137286&viewitem=&_trksid=p4340.l2562

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Fossils, Rocks, & Akiko Video


Fossils, Rocks & Akiko from The Field Museum on Vimeo.

The Field Museum of Chicago, Illinois has released a video (about 2 minutes in length) of a behind the scenes in the preparatory lab. This video highlights Chief Preparator in the Fossil Vertebrate section Akiko Shinya. She shows some of the work process of preparing a Psittacosaur from Mongolia.

After seeing the video, I should be wearing hearing protection along with my eye and airway gear during fossil prep. Maybe padded gloves might help as the engraver makes my hand tingle or numb after continuous prolonged use.

This dinosaur existed in the Cretaceous Period (130-100 million years ago).  Learn more at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psittacosaurus

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Platyrachella Devonian Brachiopod


Look at the wingspan on this fossil brachiopod, it is not fully intact yet measures about 7 cm. Yeah baby!

This brachiopod is a Platyrachella sp. found in the Cedar Valley formation of Benton County, Iowa. It lived in the Middle Devonian period. This is one large Devonian brachiopod that I have not found an equivalent genus to in the fossils of the local Jeffersonville or Silver Creek limestones.



The brachiopod was photographed wet and was cleaned with a Dremel tool - stainless steel rotary brush and Dremel engraver 1-2.5 settings.



This fossil was bought from eBay seller timfossil2001 who has some nice deals on Minnesota and Iowa fossils: http://www.ebay.com/sch/timfossil2001/m.html?item=370559137286&viewitem=&_trksid=p4340.l2562


Monday, November 21, 2011

Acrocyathus Mississippian Fossil Coral



These rugose coral fossils were found in Floyd County, Indiana in the St. Louis Limestone.  This limestone dates back to the Middle Mississippian (Carboniferous) period.  The corals appear to be Acrocyathus floriformis? also referred to as Lithostronchia or Lithostrotion or Lithostrotionella. These coral fossils also are found in Kentucky, Missouri, West Virginia, and maybe Alabama. Thanks to Alan for help with identification.

See a Lithostronchia specimen on the KYANA Geological Society web site: CLICK HERE

Learn more at the Kentucky Geological Survey web site: http://www.uky.edu/KGS/fossils/rugosecolonial3.htm

See other Lithostrotion corals on Plates XXXVI and XXXVII: CLICK HERE





Sunday, November 20, 2011

Cirroceras nebrascense Ammonite


The Cirroceras nebrascense ammonite fossil displayed at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (July 2011). This fossil was probably found in South Dakota.  The creature swam the Western Interior seas of the Upper Cretaceous (Mesozoic Era).  Its Carnegie museum accession number is CM 29908.

Visit the Carnegie museum web site:  http://www.carnegiemnh.org/

View another specimen at the U.S. National Museum of Natural History: CLICK HERE

Saturday, November 19, 2011

Placenticeras whitfieldi Ammonite



The Placenticeras whitfieldi ammonite fossil displayed at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (July 2011). This fossil was found in the Black Hills of South Dakota.  The creature swam the Western Interior seas of the Upper Cretaceous (Mesozoic Era).  Its Carnegie museum accession number is CM 29833.

Visit the Carnegie museum web site:  http://www.carnegiemnh.org/


Friday, November 18, 2011

Subretepora asperato-striata Bryozoan


While researching some Waldron Shale fossil identifications for members of the Fossil Forum, I came across this little gem. When I began collecting about 4 years ago, this is one of the first fossils I found.  It is from the Waldron Shale of Clark County, Indiana.  This Middle Silurian Period specimen is actually two fossils of distinction: the side not shown is a Favosites colony and the visible side is a little branching bryozoan.  The bryozoan appears to be a Subretepora asperato-striata as seen on this web site: http://bingweb.binghamton.edu/~kwilson/Silurian/RochesterShale/RSCorBry.htm

Thanks to Dave at Views of the Mahantango for sending me this link.



Thursday, November 17, 2011

Ostrea glabra Clam Fossil



This bivalve fossil were found in the Niobarra and Pierre formations of the Western Interior Seaway.  The Ostrea glabra clam lived in the Cretaceous Period (Mesozoic Era). Some clams could grow over a meter in diameter.

Cretaceous Period Map from Wikipedia.org

This specimen (CM 53977) was on display in July 2011 at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  See my write up of that trip: CLICK HERE.

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Inoceramus Cretaceous Clam Fossil


These bivalve fossils were found in the Niobarra and Pierre formations of the Western Interior Seaway.  The Inoceramus sp. clams were one of the more common fossils found from the Cretaceous Period (Mesozoic Era). Some clams could grow over a meter in diameter.

Cretaceous Period Map from Wikipedia.org


These specimens were on display in July 2011 at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  See my write up of that trip: CLICK HERE.


Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Queens Tears Flower Blooming



This is my first attempt at a YouTube animation and I chose a flower in the sunroom that was blooming as the subject. The plant is the Queen Tears or Billbergia nutans. The video of the flower consists of 87 images taken on 11-11-11 over several hours on a 7 minute interval. The video is set to segments of Wagner's Fantasie, Funeral March, and Finale performed by the U.S. Marine Band.

Thanks to Aunt Nita for the plant with its so exotic blooms.

Video can be found directly at this link: http://youtu.be/4T-K8doGPFs

Same plant blooming in December 2009 (LINK)

Sunday, November 13, 2011

African Archean Fossil


This specimen is thought to be over 2.5 billion years old. Bacteria and algae appeared at this time in the water.  Volcanic activity produced increased atmospheric pressure and temperature.  The higher temperature caused serpentization of the sediments thus the green color. In between the layers the micro stromatolites (like algal mats).


This fossil was found in southern Africa's Greenstone Belt.  Its green color definitely matches the formation name.  Unique about the fossil material is it is called butterstone dated to the geologic eon Archean.
See more on eBay: CLICK HERE
 


In addition, here are pictures of oolitic agate formed on a Wyoming seafloor during the Eocene. Check it out on eBay: CLICK HERE





Friday, November 11, 2011

KYANA Geological Society Annual Show 2011


Another good show to attend if you are in the Louisville, Kentucky area November 12-13, 2011. The gym of the Resurrection Lutheran Church was filled with tables selling minerals, jewelry, fossils, geology supplies, art, and holiday gifts.


The main display attraction is a set of fluorescent minerals presented by Danny Settles of Danville, Kentucky. He had three custom cases with shortwave, midwave, and longwave UV fluorescent minerals. The cases were contained in a black curtain area with an illuminated green light button.  Once the viewer pressed the button, the incandescent lights turned off the UV lights switched on.  As Danny explained to me, the lights were custom made with a preheating system to extend the bulb life and cooling fans to keep the bulbs from getting too hot.  After a fixed amount of time the UV lights power off and the white light returns.

The longwave UV case had Weardale, England fluorite (blue-purple), North Carolina opal (green), Canada sodalite (orange), and I think fluorite China and Ohio. Not as familiar with midwave specimens but the red one is from Iran. Shortwave UV specimens are of course dominated by Franklin/Sterling Hill, New Jersey.


Another display case had a very interesting knife with what looks to be an agate handle and meteorite iron blade. The next picture shows what appear to be cut and polished Kentucky agate specimens.



I met a number of friendly dealers and members of the KYANA Geological Society of which I belong. Since I also maintain the web site I tried extra hard this year to get names of people and companies whose material was at the show I was taking pictures of.  Unfortunately, I ran out of time and did not get to see every table at the show but the following is a sampling of people I visited with.

Two dealers I do not believe I encountered before were nice enough to chat with me. John LaMont traveled to Louisville from Brookville, Indiana and runs Lamont's Rock Pile (Jewelry, Carvings, Fossils, Slabs, Cabs, Misc.).  He had some appropriate carving of horses which I thought were very nice. Also on display were a parrot and eagle. In addition, he had a variety of Ordovician trilobites from Ohio (Flexicalymene), fish from Wyoming, ammonites from Madagascar, cephalopods from Morocco, and trilobites from Utah.



A dealer I believe is new to the Louisville show but a veteran of show circuit is Mark Palatas. He had a large selection of Paleozoic shark teeth.  In addition, a good selection of Waldron Shale fossils which I enjoy studying. The following pictures of the Indiana crinoid calyx and Paciphacops Oklahoma trilobites also below to him.




I encountered long time KYANA member and dealer Bob Robinson selling polished spheres and slabs.


Long time mineral and fossil dealer Alan Goldstein had some very nice iridescent pyrite specimens from Kentucky for sale.



Panoramic image of the show floor taken 11-11-11.



So if you are looking for a holiday gift or want to increase your geological collection, visit the show.  Admission and parking are free. Learn more at the KYANA Geological Society web site: http://www.kyanageo.org/showflier.htm




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