Monday, February 28, 2011

Tylothyris Brachiopod?


A somewhat crushed fossil but with excellent growth lines shown in this picture.  It appears to be a Tylothyris sp. brachiopod.  The Indiana State Museum web site was used for the identification (see link).

Thanks to Alan at the Falls of the Ohio State Park for providing another identification for this fossil. It could be a Punctospirifer subelliptica (McChesney).

This fossil was found in the Borden Formation of the New Providence Shale Member of Clark County Indiana.  Brachiopod is dated to the Mississippian Period.  Thanks to Kenny for letting me photograph it.



Sunday, February 27, 2011

Aulopora on Orthospirifer Brachiopod


One of the easier fossils to prep with sand abrasion cleaning are specimens from the Silver Creek Limestone of Clark County, Indiana.  I believe it is this layer of limestone that the county's large concrete plant uses to manufacture product.  This fossil is the Orthospirifer brachiopod and it has a nice colony of Aulopora coral growing on it.  The brachiopod and coral lived in the Middle Devonian Period.

Thanks to Kenny for cleaning this one up for me!





Friday, February 25, 2011

Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian Brachiopods For Sale


Pictured are 16 brachiopods from three different time periods (Ordovician, Silurian, and Devonian). 

Brachiopods were at one time a prolific animal in Earth's ancient seas.  Today there are fewer species that inhabit deep ocean.  These fossils were found in the states of Indiana and Kentucky (USA).

The Ordovician period fossils are the Platystrophia ponderosa, Hebertella occidentalis, Sowerbyella sp., and Zygospira modesta?.

The Silurian period fossils are Eospirifer eudora, Eospirifer radiatus (partial), Meristina maria, Homoeospira evax, Atrypa newsomensis, and Stegerhynchus sp.

The Devonian period fossils are Orthospirifer sp., Pseudoatrypa sp., Athyris fultonensis, Brevispirifer gregarius, Spirifera vericosa, and Productella spinulicosta.

All fossils have printed labels showing name, time period, stratigraphy, and location.  Each fossil has its own plastic bag. Ruler not included with fossils.

Shipping to the United States and select international countries.

Check out the auction on eBay ends February 28, 2011.










Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Metopolichas breviceps Trilobite


Recently, I read on the Fossil Forum about a find in the Waldron Shale of a Metopolichas breviceps trilobite pygidium.  It reminded me of something Kenny found in southern Indiana as well.  He sent me the pictures of a cephalon and pygidium of the type of Silurian fossil.  It was found in Clark County, Indiana.  Be advised this trilobite was once known as the Lichas breviceps.

Note on the picture below. The trilobite is mixed into what appears to be a Lichenalia concentrica bryozoan.


Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Clark County Devonian Brachiopods


The image shows a collection of six brachiopods found in the Jeffersonville Limestone of Clark County, Indiana.  The Athyris fultonensis, Pseudoatrypa, Orthospirifer, and Spirifera vericosa are relatively common.  The spiny brachiopod Productella spinulicosta is rare and very hard to find with intact spines.  The Brevispirifer gregarius is an index fossil that identifies certain zones of the Jeffersonville Limestone.  It is usually found in sheets or shell halves.  Finding an intact one eroded out is a rare treat.  These last two images show close ups of one of these intact specimens.



Monday, February 21, 2011

Silurian Brachiopods For Sale


Pictured are 8 brachiopod fossils from the Silurian Period.  All were collected in Clark County, Indiana in the Waldron Shale. 

UPDATE: This auction is over but another with more brachiopods is on eBay (ends July 22, 2011):

10 Silurian Brachiopods for sale

The Atrypa newsomensis is probably the most commonly found brachiopod and it is preserves quite well.


The large radial lines stand out on the Eospirifer eudora brachiopod.


The Eospirifer radiatus brachiopod is one of the larger brachiopods found.  They are somewhat rare.  This specimen has been crushed but the fine radial lines are still mostly visible.


The Homoeospira evax is another somewhat rare brachiopod to find.  It has distinctive radial lines.


This internal mold of a Meristina maria brachiopod is another of the larger brachiopod found.  These fossils are some what tricky to photograph.  A distinctive feature is the U shaped ridge.


A fairly rare brachiopod and somewhat small is the Parmorthis waldronensis.


One of the smallest brachiopods to find but relatively common is the Stegerhynchus sp.


The Whitfieldella nitida is another hard to find brachiopod.


I have tried to identify these fossils the best I could.  Hopefully, there are no mistakes.  All the fossils will be in individual bags with an identification label.  Ruler not included with fossils.

Click here to see listing on eBay.

Saturday, February 19, 2011

Fimbrispirifer grieri


A Fimbrispirifer grieri brachiopod found in the Jeffersonville Limestone of Jefferson County, Kentucky.  This animal existed in the Middle Devonian Period.  Species named by James Hall in 1857 who at the time called it Spirifera grieri.





Friday, February 18, 2011

Centrorhynchus Brachiopod


This brachiopod was found with the one shown yesterday.  Again another specimen I do not think I have found before.  It appears to be a Centrorhynchus sp. found in the Jeffersonville Limestone of Jefferson County, Kentucky.  Specimen dates to Middle Devonian period.




Thursday, February 17, 2011

Camarotoechia Brachiopod


The nice weather and the increased amount of daylight was enough reason for a little evening collecting.  Here is what might be a Camarotoechia brachiopod (Hall & Clarke 1893).   It is the first one I have found.  Fossil is from the Jeffersonville Limestone of Jefferson County, Kentucky.  Specimen dates to the Middle Devonian period.



Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Brachiopod Fossils for Sale


Pictured are 8 brachiopod fossils from the Paleozoic Era for sale. All were collected, cleaned and labeled by me. The fossils span about 140 million years of geological history representing the Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian periods.  The fossils were found in the United States in the states of Indiana and Kentucky.

UPDATE: This auction is over but some more are available that expire November 2, 2011.

Ordovician Orthorhynchula linneyi Brachiopod Kentucky

Ordovician Platystrophia Brachiopod Kentucky

Devonian Spirifera vericosa Indiana

Devonian Orthospirifer Indiana

Silurian Eospirifer eudora Indiana

Ordovician Sowerbyella brachiopods Kentucky

Ordovician Platystrophia Brachiopod Kentucky

Devonian Mucrospirifer Canada

Invertrypa Devonian Fossil Indiana

Devonian Athryis spiriferoides New York





The star of this collection is the Platystrophia ponderosa which has been cleaned and has great growth lines visible. This is one of the best I have found.




The Ordovician period is rounded out with small but detailed Dalmanella multisecta and Sowerbyella fossils found in the Kope Formation.


A well preserved Atrypa newsomensis and a small heart shaped Stegerhynchus brachiopods represent the Waldron Shale of the Silurian period.


Some of the larger brachiopods are found in the Devonian period which is represented by the Orthospirifer and Pseudoatrypa.  The last Devonian period brachiopod is the Athyris fultonensis which sort of has the oil lamp shell look.

I have tried to identify these fossils the best I could.  Hopefully, there are no mistakes.  All the fossils will be in individual bags with an identification label.  Ruler not included with fossils. The package with fossils weighs approximately 5 ounces.

Check out this eBay auction for this brachiopod collection with a bidding price starting at $2.99 with shipping to a location in the United States at $4.  Good luck to all bidders and I hope the winner appreciates these fossils as I have.